Sedating antihistamines for children

Certain H1 antagonists, such as promethazine, have a local anesthetic effect.Other H1-antihistamines having an important antimuscarinic activity like diphenhydramine and dimenhydrinate, are used in preventive and curative treatment of motion sickness, but scopolamine which has no antihistamine effect seems more effective than them in preventive treatment.Histamine is a chemical released from allergic cells in the body (such as mast cells and basophils), usually in response to an allergen like cat dander or pollen.When histamine is released by allergic cells in the nose and eyes, the result is sneezing, runny nose, itchy eyes/nose/throat, nasal congestion, and post-nasal drip.In addition, each compound can have or not have parallel properties, antimuscarinic effects for example.This distinction between generations must be taken with caution because a product considered as non sedative or not antimuscarinic can, in certain circumstances, large doses or particular susceptibility of the patient ,have these effects.

The first-genaration antihistamines have alpha adrenolytic activity which can decrease the vasoconstrictive effect of adrenaline and noradrenaline and an antimuscarinic effect with the corresponding adverse effects.Therefore, this article will only discuss the newer antihistamines, as described below.Newer antihistamines, called second-generation antihistamines include: It's important to note that montelukast (Singulair), is not an antihistamine, but rather an antileukotriene medication.Antihistamines also can be used on an as needed basis for those who experience occasional symptoms or symptoms triggered by exposure to certain irritants such as animal hair, plants, medications, and food products.Some antihistamines also may be used occasionally to help with sleep.